The odd things you find online when you’re not looking:

http://youtu.be/NHFCGTqIr1g

John Lennon playing basketball with Miles Davis at what seems to be the Lennon home at Ascot, with cameos from Betty Davis (despite the fact she and Miles divorced in ’69 they were clearly still talking), Yoko Ono, Andy Warhol, and the famous Lennon roller. Looking at Lennon, it must be early to mid 1971.

The story of how the Bee Gees reworked themselves, from Rolling Stone July, 1977 (which brings to mind that Bobby Womack quote (to Marvin) from the last post).

The Bee Gees’ songwriting talent is quite extraordinary. They write hits the way most people write postcards. They write them on demand – any time, anyplace, on any subject. They’ve written a lot of them while sitting on staircases. “Jive Talkin’,” one of their latest hits, was written on a causeway between Miami and Miami Beach. “I Can’t See Nobody,” one of their early hits, was written in the dressing room of a club. The Bee Gees were in their midteens at the time, sharing the dressing room with a stripper.

Given the way the brothers Gibb’s career is, in the public mind, overshadowed by the word ‘disco’ (it’s not a dirty word – really…) and that movie, it’s a fascinating overview of how they ended up in a place where a mildly psychedelic-lite pop trio (Odessa and Idea are both wonderful albums BTW – and critically acclaimed at the time) mutated into the biggest white dance act the world has ever seen.

“We’re fully aware that our music is almost totally commercial,” says Barry. “We write for the present.”

Sometime in the 60s..

Black Sabbath passed their sell-by date around the time they delivered their third album (and if we are being brutally honest their worthy moments would probably leave a track spare on a four track EP) but I guess there are enough ageing former fifth formers and middle American knuckle draggers out there to fill a stadium here and there – thus we have the inevitable reunion.

This time, however Ozzy and co have reworked history to paint out drummer Bill Ward who is in mid-tantrum with the others and won’t play on what is just – like most supposedly fan driven reunions – just a shameless cash grab.

More at the NYT, but meanwhile here are some before and after shots from the Sabbath site:

Black Sabbath before

Black Sabbath after

Finally, via Gary Steel, comes this wonderful mini-doco on The Associates. As Gary said on FB: Oh Billy, what a voice you had.

Indeed.